A Useless Street in Stralsund

We spent the day catching up on washing and other boring tasks. While studying the map of Stralsund I could see how the street names refer to important concepts or people in the town with history and geography interwoven in everyday use. Mönchstr. Jacobichorstr. and Klosterstr. refer to the various historical religious places. Bechermacherstr. is the street of the cup makers. P...
Read More

Stralsund and Greifswald 2

The bicycle route from Stralsund to Greifswald is 20 km of heritage protected cobblestone road, something we’re fairly keen to avoid as cobblestone, despite its beauty, is dreadfully on both my bike and on my equanimity.  We’re so comfortable in our accommodation in Stralsund that we decided to take the train to Greifswald and make it a day-trip.We took our bikes too so th...
Read More

Stralsund and Greifswald 1

Anne-Rose organised accommodation for us in the local sports centre. As well as the usual basketball courts and soccer field, there are five guest rooms above the canteen/bar. Our showers and toilet are those used by the general public. Our room is spacious, with two sets of bunks, a small table, four chairs, two wardrobes and lots of spare space. It’s also warm and dry! Luxury...
Read More

Wismar to Stralsund

On leaving Wismar, we decided to try following Google Maps to get to Kahlenberg where we planned to stay the night with relatives. Google Maps took us the most direct route – through a suburb of gardens, along a very bumpy cobblestone street which gradually degenerated into a dirt and rock laneway, past a farmhouse and into the woods where the laneway became a narrow, mudd...
Read More

Lübeck to Wismar

I set off with Anne-Rose on our tour along the Baltic Coast towards Gdansk. She wants to travel along the coastline and enjoy the beach. I want to see the Hanseatic cities so this trip suits us both quite well.We cycled to the Herrentunnel which goes under the Trave. Cyclists and walkers aren’t allowed in this tunnel so there’s a bus which took us through at no cost. In Travemü...
Read More

Lübeck – Three Stories

A venerable old city like Lübeck has to have a treasure trove of stories hidden in her alleyways and brickwork, stories which delight and fascinate tourists and locals alike, stories which link the reader to the past and bring those bygone days to life.Merchants Under Attack:In the Schiffergesellschaft there is an alcove in the wall which displays an old rifle, a sword and a ca...
Read More

Lübeck – The Schiffergesellschaft

Anne-Rose and I went to the Schiffergesellschaft, a very old and atmospheric restaurant in the central old part of Lübeck.This site was first mentioned in writing in 1229, almost 800 years ago, but the current building dates from 1538 when it was built as part of a much larger complex.On the 26. December, 1401 a guild, the Schiffergesellschaft, was established to ‘aid and comfo...
Read More

The Cemetery at Süderende on the Island of Föhr.

Renate took me on a tour of Föhr. The most impressive sight, apart from the sea, the landscape, the old houses with their thatched roofs, the cute villages and the bronze age earth ring fort was the cemetery at Süderende. Here are hundreds of gravestones giving testimony to the lives of the locals. Modern gravestones tend to list only the names and dates of birth and death of t...
Read More

Hallig Hooge

Renate took me off to spend a day on Hallig Hooge. A hallig is an island which is so low-lying that it can easily be inundated by sea water during storms and floods. As a result, the inhabitants long ago built mounds of rocks and earth, (where did they get these from?) covered them with grass and built their homes on top. Hallig Hooge has 10 such mounds called warfts, each...
Read More

Icons of Lübeck

Lübeck is a beautiful old city, for many centuries a free and independent political entity and once known as the Queen of the Hanseatic League. The city was inscribed in the World Heritage List in 1987 by UNESCO because it exemplifies the power and the historic role of the Hanseatic League. From the 13th until the 17th centuries, merchants from all around the Baltic Sea an...
Read More

The Bridge at Remagen

The Ludendorff Bridge at Remagen was built by Russian prisoners of war during World War I to deliver troops and supplies to the German Army at the Western Front. It had railway tracks which could be covered over for road transport and towers were built at each end for defense. By early March, 1942 there were only two bridges left over the Rhine. All the others had been des...
Read More

The Rhine

The journey from Frankfurt to the North Cape of Norway began with great excitement!I took the train to Bingen, rode 43km along the Rhine to Boppard then hopped on the train again to Bonn. This section of the Rhine was included on The UNESCO World Heritage List for it's dramatic and varied natural landscape and its castles, historic towns and vineyards. 
Read More